Incomplete Thought by Robert Chalender

Incomplete thought

Lust For Life Tattoo proudly presents Incomplete Thought
a solo exhibition by Robert Chalender
Opening on Thursday 6th of August
On show until the 31st of August.

Incomplete Thought is a striking look into the mind and politics of Bleeding Kansas artist Robert Chalender.

Owner of Strait Jacket Press, Robert set up shop in Fortitude Valley two years ago, it is in this studio on Brunswick, St. where Robert tends to vent his frustration about the world onto canvas.

Born and raised into what is termed as the Heartland of America, Robert’s Midwestern mind and historical conceptions about ‘Americana’, creatively enable him to produce works of art that touch on the consumerist, hedonistic and fame focus of today‘s popular America and beyond.

By perfecting a multilayer technique using segments of recognizable popular classic and contemporary images, then seamlessly integrating text, these medium to massive scale pieces confront the audience and question the role of Mass Media and Fame in today’s society.

Robert’s work is often at times a puzzle, and feels almost incomplete, as if the canvas he is using to communicate his message is too small dimensionally, for his thought to be communicated definitively.

The exhibition will include these montages and many of his limited edition screen prints.

Change Of Season – Group Exhibition

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Lust For Life proudly presents multi-artist group exhibition ‘Change Of Season’ on show now until the 31st of May.
The show features works by a  high calibre mix of Brisbane artists with members of the artist collective / gallery space LOVE LOVE contributing multiple pieces.

Alongside these exceptional works are pieces from hyper-realist artist Duncan Mattock using meticulous master techniques and skateboard recycling, Viking depicting artist PhilB who’s work is all skilfully painted during train rides around Brisbane.

Well worth checking out to see works by some of Brisbane’s finest artist.

CHANGE OF SEASON on show now until 31st of May.

Gyaru – an Exhibition by Tiffany Atkin

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Local artist Tiffany Atkin openly admits she’s obsessed with Japan and she describes her latest solo exhibition as “Japanfluenced POP illustration with bite!”

In her exhibition GYARU: An exploration of femininity in contemporary Japanese pop culture, not only does the artwork look good enough to eat, the work itself explores some deeper concepts and representations of femininity within Japanese popular culture. Atkin was inspired by how individuality is asserted through fashion and behaviour, and the way this continues to fuel a sense of subversion to mainstream popular culture in Japan.

Her work culminated from many years of ideas, adventures, life lessons, late nights, growth, discovery, loves, losses and a heartfelt respect for a land and culture so significant to her journey as an artist and human.

Local businesses Lust for Life, iro iro POP!, Harajuku Gyoza, 4 Pines Brewing Company, Maiocchi and Takara Gallery Workroom (Japan) have jumped on board to support the talented artist too.

Between the moments of creating and drawing, we managed to sit Tiffany down and discuss her exhibition and her life as an artist.

When did your love affair with Japan begin?

I studied Japanese language and culture in my early school years and continued throughout high school and uni. When I finally moved to Tokyo in 2010 (alone, with no real plan), it was a massive influence on me, both creatively and as a young woman finding my way in the world.

The culture shock was something I embraced, there was certainly an adjustment period as anyone who has spent time actually living in a different country will confirm (particularly one as different as Japan), but I truly loved every moment of altering my perceptions and understanding on everything from making and exhibiting art, designing for Japanese clients, to just buying groceries, social interactions and daily life in general.

I was lucky to have Japanese language skills and an established friend circle there, which made the transition much easier. The whole experience really changed my outlook on so many things, and Tokyo is still my creative muse. The love affair continues!

Have you always wanted to be an artist? Are you fulfilled on your journey? What are your aspirations?

Oddly enough, I was once hurtling down a musical path and probably thought I was going to be some guitar-wielding Aussie rock chick (ha!). I grew up in a musical family (my parents met when my dad joined my mum’s band) and used to write and perform a lot of music both solo and in bands and duos. I had some interest from a few industry notables about recording an album, but I was young and very naive and it all fell through, which was a blessing in hindsight.

I signed up to uni to study design as a backup if my “music career” didn’t eventuate. It sounds really funny to me now looking back, because it didn’t take long to get completely hooked on art, design and illustration, and I have made it my career. I still make music in my home studio, it’s a nice little break from design and illustration that still lets me make something and express myself in a different way.

I’ve recently been working on a few projects where I can combine music and art, and one of my goals for 2015 is to develop that a little more. I am also working towards a show in Tokyo in 2016. I think as an artist, we are never fulfilled, as soon as you feel like you’ve “made it” then you’re no longer growing or moving forward and pretty soon you’ll be left behind. It’s up to us as creatives to constantly keep developing, evolving and seeking our own truths. The journey is never over.

Artists that inspire you?

I admire artists who have made a great career out of their craft. Illustrators like Kat Macleod, Beci Orpin, Bec Winnel, Rik Lee and Bei Badgirl. I am also really inspired by Japanese artists like Yayoi Kusama, and an artist called Xhxix (he is really secretive about his identity but his work is incredible). I also admire lady musos like Adalita, Ella Hooper and Patience from The Grates. They’re just rad folk doing rad things AND they are super nice people.

What do you want people to say as they wander through your exhibition?

“Jeeves, I’ll take one of everything, thank you!” Seriously though, I just want people to feel what I felt when I created the work. Everything in this show is a culmination of many years of ideas and fascination with the beautiful enigma that is Japan. I hope that this underlying personal journey can be felt and appreciated by everyone who views the work.
Best life advice you’ve ever received?

“The only one you truly need to convince/ impress is your toughest critic of all – yourself.” In my industry, and especially with the prevalence of social media, it’s tempting to get hung up on what others are doing/ thinking/ saying/ eating/ breathing/ brushing their teeth with, but ultimately it’s just a waste of time comparing yourself – time that could be spent making something that you can be proud of.

Having said that, I actually really do value social media, it has been a wonderful tool for me to gain exposure and reach a larger audience, but in moderation. I think most would agree it’s a dangerous vice when combined with self-doubt or a bad attitude.

Tell me about some of your experiences in Japan and what they taught you?

I could probably write a very long-winded essay on this subject, but to put it simply – life in Japan not only inspired me artistically, but also changed my perspective on things in general. The efficiency of daily routines and the respect people have for one another has definitely influenced the way I live my life. Moving to a new city alone is also a pretty liberating experience, and Japan was the perfect place to nurture my need for new adventures.

All in all I’d say my experiences in Japan (both as a regular tourist and temporary resident) have given me the confidence in myself as an artist and capable human adult. If I can navigate Shinjuku station, which should have its own postcode, then I’m sure I can (insert seemingly difficult task here!).

GYARU: An exploration of femininity in contemporary Japanese pop culture opens February 5 at Lust for Life Gallery. There will be VIP goody bags for the first few people through the door on opening night so make sure you get there early

Special Thanks to B-Mag.

Metaphor In Every Corner of the Room

Phoebe Paradise

Launching on 3rd of July, ‘Metaphor In Every Corner of the Room’ combines the talents of three young Brisbane illustrators into an exhibition that touches on a diverse mural of themes and inspiration. From the Low Brow Punk aesthic of the 80’s & 90’s, to the role light and colour play as a reflection of happiness and texture in everyday plants and objects.

With each artist Phoebe Paradise, Erin Michelle and Elle-Louise Burguez, using and combining their preferred mediums; be it pen and ink illustration, watercolour, gouache, prismacolor pencils, paper – cutouts or texta’s. This exhibition is full of colour and light. Originals and print editions from all artists will be available all through out June and July.

The special launch event on 3rd of July will feature products and merchandise from Lust for Life Tattoo and Sabotage Social, original and prints from exhibiting artists, Phoebe Paradise, Erin Michelle Ward and Elle-Louise Burguez, and will host the launch of new ‘zine: Doing Things.

Be sure to check out new works by these up and coming multi talented Artists.

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Mason and Sinclair

MEDIA RELEASE FEBRUARY 2013

MASON SINCLAIR: TRASH BANDITS, SCROUNGE LIZARDS

Launch night featuring DJ Judy Jetson 

(Host and DJ of Subterranea on 4ZZZ)

Thursday 7 March 7pm – 9pm

On display 7 March – 31 March 2013 at Lust For Life gallery

In March Lust For Life welcomes artists Melanie Mason and Belinda Sinclair, Bayside residents reclaiming their cultural heritage piece by literal piece. 

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